Deathisdefeated

O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory?

Progressive Covenantalism as an Integrating Motif of Scripture

 

I want to link to Tim and Jeff’s website where they have this most interesting article that many of you might find quite fascinating.

 

Here is the link to their site and I’ve posted their excerpt and further links of interest below also.

 

http://www.beyondcreationscience.com/index.php?pr=Prog._Covenantalism

 

Progressive Covenantalism as an Integrating Motif of Scripture

 

Editor's Note: We offer this stimulating article to our readers because the central topic is a powerful demonstration of Covenant Creation. 

You will have to click on the article to read the entire presentation. It is lengthy. Our readers should also understand that the authors remain committed to futurism as can be shown in this quote:

The testimony of Scripture is that the new covenant brings to completion God’s eschatological plan for redeemed humanity and the rest of creation (cf. Rom 8:18-23). In the eternal state, “heaven and a renewed earth are joined into regained and consummated Eden” Of particular interest is “the Holy City, the new Jerusalem” (Rev 21:2) that descends “out of heaven from God”. The Lord magnificently adorned the new Jerusalem (the bride) for her husband (the groom). The implication here is that the city surpassed the beauty of everything else God had made. Some think the new Jerusalem will be a literal city where God’s people dwell for all eternity. Others think the holy city is symbol of the united, redeemed community in heaven. In either case, it’s clear that a new world is coming, and it will be glorious beyond imagination.

Can you see the oddity? On the one hand the writers affirm that "...the new covenant brings to completion God's eschatological plan..." Yet, somehow, believers who now live under the new covenant must be looking forward to something more, a "new world" that is a more fullfilled "new covenant" than the new covenant Christ brings through his completed work of redemption! Ah, the dilemmas of traditional futurism.

Note also how the conception of "the creation" in Romans 8 leads necessarily to the authors' futurist conclusions. An honest look at the text, however, leads to the proper understanding of "the Creation" of which Paul. Romans 8 simply must be understood in covenant context. (See Romans 8 in Covenant Context ) Amazing how a simple modification to that definition of "the creation," so clearly covenantal and personal in Paul's theology, transforms the futuristic eschatological expectation automatically assumed by the authors. The problem, again, is the failure to recognize covenant context.

Regardless of our quibble on that point, the following article demonstrates how mainstream Christian theology continues to drift toward the gradual awareness of the central thrust of the Covenant Creation view. We offer these excerpts from the article to highlight this most crucial point. We think they, along with the entire article, will be well worth your time.

Tim Martin & Jeff Vaughn


Progressive Covenantalism as an Integrating Motif of Scripture

By Dan T. Lioy

Progressive covenantalism is a new working model for comprehending the relationship between the Old and New Testaments. The goal is to articulate a consistent understanding of how to put together seemingly heterogeneous portions of Scripture. This integrating motif asserts that God’s progressive revelation of His covenants is an extension of the kingdom blessings He first introduced in creation. Affiliated claims are that the various covenants revealed in Scripture are interrelated and build on one another, that the people of God throughout the history of salvation are united, and that they equally share in His eschatological promises...

...This endeavor mirrors the ongoing task of theology. As König explains, “theology is not merely repeating what is written in the Bible but rather rethinking the biblical material” so as to foster greater understanding

What is the reason for introducing another approach to explain the intertextuality between the testaments? It is centered in the shortcomings associated with the concept of “dispensations”. Patton and Dyck note that over the past century, dispensationalism has focused on the discontinuity in the master plan of God. Indeed, the spotlight is on the separate ways in which the Lord has worked among His people in different periods of time. The lecturers observe that this emphasis is misplaced. Rather than accent distinctions within different portions of Scripture, it is more helpful to talk about the unity of the divine plan for the faith community throughout history. In this case, God’s covenant with His people is the basis for seeing more continuity than discontinuity between the testaments...

This essay reflects the conviction that while there is “great variety in the Bible”, the Word of God is also characterized by “meaningful coherence” in which thematic trajectories can be discerned. Concerning the integrating motif proposed in this treatise, the major premise is that God’s progressive revelation of His covenants is an extension of the kingdom blessings He first introduces in creation. Affiliated claims are that the various covenants revealed in Scripture are interrelated and build on one another, that the people of God throughout the history of salvation are united, and that they equally share in His eschatological promises...

This essay affirms the view that the covenant concept is used as an organizing and controlling principle of Scripture...

As Genesis 3:15 promises, the victory of the redeemed is assured by the Savior. Jesus’ followers triumph over the devil “by the blood of the Lamb and by the word of their testimony” (Rev 12:11). Scripture reveals that Christ’s atoning sacrifice on the cross overcame the forces of darkness (Isa 53:12; Luke 24:26, 46; 1 Pet 1:10-11). Moreover, at Calvary, the Son disarmed Satan by taking away his power to accuse believers (cf. Rom 8:1-4, 31-39; Col 2:15; Heb 2:14-15). Furthermore, Paul noted that the “God of peace” will “soon crush Satan” under the feet of the saints (Rom 16:20). Indeed, Jesus is the divine warrior who will triumph on behalf of His people at His return (2 Thes 1:5-10; Rev 19:11-21). From a human standpoint, the delay seems long; but from the divine standpoint it is imminent, being one of the next series of events on the eschatological calendar (cf. 2 Pet 3:8)...

 

Patton and Dyck liken God’s covenantal promise to Adam and Eve as a first installment on a long-term plan to fix what was broken when sin entered the human race (Rom 5:12). Thereafter, each covenant in Scripture builds on the one made in the garden of Eden. Similarly, each covenant increases the recipients of the divine plan of redemption. Together, these covenants are analogous to an ascending staircase that shows the direction in which God is leading His people. The inherent unity of the covenants is reinforced by the observation made by Smith that in the Hebrew sacred writings, “covenant . . . never occurs in the plural”. The idea is that “there is only one ‘covenant’ with many manifestations”...

 

The Edenic covenant is the basis for all the subsequent covenants in the Bible. Because these special arrangements are explicitly described in Scripture, they are called “biblical covenants”. Though they are distinct from one another, they are tightly interrelated...

 

Connected with the progressive unfolding of the previously discussed, interrelated covenants is the advancement of God’s revelation to His people concerning His eschatological program...

 

The post-resurrection account recorded in Luke 24 attests to this tight integration between the biblical covenants progressively revealed in the Old and New Testaments. In verses 25-26, the risen Messiah censured two disciples (who were going to a village called Emmaus) for being slow to believe all that the prophets had declared. In fact, Jesus’ reference to “Moses and all the Prophets” (v. 27) indicates that the messianic promises extend in a unifying way throughout all the Hebrew sacred writings...

 

This essay has sought to elaborate on the concept of progressive covenantalism, as broached by Patton and Dyck. It is a new working model for comprehending the relationship between the Old and New Testaments. The goal is to articulate a consistent understanding of how to put together seemingly heterogeneous portions of Scripture. This integrating motif asserts that God’s progressive revelation of His covenants is an extension of the kingdom blessings He first introduced in creation. Affiliated claims are that the various covenants revealed in Scripture are interrelated and build on one another, that the people of God throughout the history of salvation are united, and that they equally share in His eschatological promises...

Here is the Link for the full article

http://bible.org/article/progressive-covenantalism-integrating-moti...

 

At the following link you will find one of the authors shorter explanation and much more interesting follows his discussion with fellow dispensationalist about this drifting away from dispensationalism.

 

http://www.reclaimingthemind.org/blog/2010/08/where-i-stand-on-disp... 

 

Views: 96

Comment by Tim Martin on February 26, 2011 at 7:44pm

Norm,

 

Thanks for posting this. And for finding further discussion on the topic with your last link. I added that to the BCS page for those who would like to investigate it.

 

I did notice this statement while reading that blog:

 

"The church itself is a progressive extension of the covenant made to Israel."

 

This, of course, is a key position of dispensationalism. From a covenant eschatology viewpoint, however, this could be dismantled on many grounds, including the parables, Matt. 5:17-19, and Hebrews' clear teaching on covenants in contrast, and the passing away of the Law.

 

What I find remarkable is that all forms of futurism get splintered on this issue in one way or another. These guys extend the old covenant over the church into the new covenant age (which they view as the "present evil age"). More Reformed/Amillennial views have the old covenant passing away in the first century (at some point) with the old testament promises given to Israel transferred to the new covenant people of God, the Church. So national Israel has come to an end, but the promises (particularly resurrection) were never realized by Israel and are re-applied to the Church.

 

It seems to me there is no way around this dilemma within a futurist view. They have to put the Church back under the old covenant administration (against NT teaching) or they have to divorce the Church's (futurist) eschatology from the promises given to Israel under the old Covenant.

 

Full preterism solves this dilemma so beautifully...

 

Am I missing something?

 

Tim Martin

 

 

 

Comment by Tami on February 27, 2011 at 3:40pm

Tim this is a great summary:

 

"It seems to me there is no way around this dilemma within a futurist view. They have to put the Church back under the old covenant administration (against NT teaching) or they have to divorce the Church's (futurist) eschatology from the promises given to Israel under the old Covenant."

 

Thanks,

Tami

Comment by Patrick on February 27, 2011 at 5:23pm

Growing up dispensationlist, I have to agree with Ed.  Dispy's separate Israel and the Church.  The Church will be raptured and God will deal with Israel again. The Church did not replace Israel.  (Oddly enough I still believe this - thus the title "Dispensational Preterist")

 

As a side note, I created this chart several years ago when I was a dispy and felt the dispensations should be based on covenants.  I am sure it is highly flawed, but it is what it is.

 

http://thepreteristpost.ning.com/profiles/blogs/dispensations-and-c...

Comment by Tim Martin on February 27, 2011 at 6:38pm

Yes, Ted. I see your point.

 

The issue is the definition of "Israel."

 

My comments above assumed the common definition among dispensationalists that "Israel" is a physical race of people descended from Abraham. Dispensationalism of the "Progressive Covenantalism" sort above appears to mesh this definition of Israel with the Church being an extension of that body in some odd way. That is the basis of what I was analyzing. I think it is highly problematic without any covenant transition.

 

I agree with your view. It's just that your view (with covenant transition and the resurrection of Israel completed in A.D. 70) is not the same view the author above cited, since he has a future resurrection. In other words, he has the Church as an extension of the Old Covenant, even while living (in some sense) under the new covenant through faith in Christ.

 

It is a Frankenstein system, to be sure. Take away covenant transition and really bad conclusions result. Your view assumes covenant transition, which I think is precisely the point that solves the dilemma. The Church is true Israel, but it is Israel made-new, resurrected, brought into the glory of the fulfilled New Covenant. That, technically, is not an extension of the old covenant body of national Israel. See my point?

 

Hope that helps!

 

Tim Martin

Comment

You need to be a member of Deathisdefeated to add comments!

Join Deathisdefeated

Events

Forum

TFCmagazine

Started by Allyn Morton in Eschatology. Last reply by Allyn Morton Jul 18. 6 Replies

Is fasting ever commanded?

Started by Eohn Rhodes in Eschatology Jun 28. 0 Replies

Has anyone notice Max King's latest book ?

Started by Stairway To Heaven in Eschatology. Last reply by william f. Jul 3. 1 Reply

Choosing Life or Death

Started by Delom Dongo in Eschatology. Last reply by Jesus_Is_Risen Apr 23. 1 Reply

490 Year Countdown

Started by Eohn Rhodes in Eschatology. Last reply by Eohn Rhodes 17 hours ago. 48 Replies

Satan is eternally dead?

Started by Joy Ackerman in Eschatology. Last reply by Doug Mar 4. 40 Replies

Resurrection and 2000 years of Christian History

Started by Jesus_Is_Risen in Eschatology. Last reply by Jesus_Is_Risen Jan 2. 20 Replies

Resurrection and Paul's trial (Acts 23:6)

Started by Jesus_Is_Risen in Eschatology. Last reply by Jesus_Is_Risen Feb 25. 7 Replies

Resurrection

Started by Jesus_Is_Risen in Eschatology. Last reply by Jesus_Is_Risen Jul 18. 518 Replies

Renewal of Covenant

Started by Eohn Rhodes in Eschatology. Last reply by Eohn Rhodes May 19, 2013. 5 Replies

A Simple thought...

Started by Doug in Eschatology. Last reply by Dustin Curlee Mar 4. 4 Replies

The ( fulfilled ) Hope of Glory

Started by Charles Shank in Eschatology Apr 14, 2013. 0 Replies

1 Cor 15:24-28; who is "he," "his" and "him"?

Started by Erika Roland in Eschatology. Last reply by Charles Shank Apr 14, 2013. 4 Replies

© 2014   Created by Tim Martin.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service